Student Learning Outcomes

                                               

Degree Granting Programs

Each degree granting program must select at least three student learning outcomes (SLO's).  One of which must be related to knowledge of the discipline and one must be related to either critical thinking or written communication.

For information about a particular program's SLO's, please contact that department directly.

Liberal Arts Curriculum Student Learning Outcomes (LACSLO's)

Written Communication

Rationale:

The one skill most often appearing in lists of “top skills” requested by employers is communication.  Effective written communication is essential in the workplace.  It goes beyond just using language to the ability to convey information with understanding of audience.

Definition:

Written Communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. Written communication involves learning to work in many genres and styles. It can involve working with many different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. Written communication abilities develop through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

Evaluative Components:

  • Student writing demonstrates an understanding of context, audience, and purpose
  • Student writing uses appropriate, relevant, and compelling content to convey understanding
  • Student writing demonstrates attention to genre and disciplinary conventions
  • Student writing demonstrates skillful use of credible and relevant sources
  • Student writing demonstrates control of syntax and mechanics

Critical Thinking

Rationale:

Alongside communication, critical thinking frequently selected by employers as an essential skill.  The ability to assess a situation, seek multiple perspectives, gather more information if necessary, and identify key issues that need to be addressed is a highly sought after skill.

Definition: 

Critical Thinking is a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of ideas, issues, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

Evaluative Components:

  • Students describe the issue or problem to be considered clearly and comprehensively
  • Students evaluate information taken from sources develop a comprehensive analysis or synthesis
  • Students systematically analyze and consider their own and others assumptions  or biases and evaluate the relevance of context when presenting a position
  • Students take a position, perspective, thesis, or hypothesis which accounts for the complexities of an issue while acknowledging others’ points of view and limits of the position
  • Student reaches conclusions which are logical and reflect a range of information; including opposing viewpoints.  Related outcomes (i.e. consequences, implications) are clearly identified.

Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning

Rationale:

In our information-rich society we need to interpret numerical claims and judge their accuracy.  All educated citizens should be able to understand mathematics and scientific claims well enough to develop informed opinions. In the workplace a highly sought after skill is the ability to analyze and understand data. Many lists of top skills include statistical analysis and data mining.

Definition:

A “habit of mind”, competency, and comfort in working with numerical data and scientific concepts.  The ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations

Evaluative Components:

  • Students distinguish between a scientific argument and a non-scientific argument
  • Students recognize methods of inquiry that lead to scientific knowledge
  • Students distinguish between causal and correlational relationships
  • Students reach conclusions based on their own analysis of numerical information (numbers, graphs, statistics, etc.
  • Students use numerical information to examine a real world problem or issue (unemployment, climate change, public health, etc.). 
  • Students evaluate what other have  concluded from numerical information

Intercultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Rationale:

There is possibly no bigger issue in the workplace than diversity, and job-seekers must demonstrate a sensitivity and awareness to other people and cultures. Beyond mere exposure, this requires the capacity to meaningfully engage those others, place social justice in historical and political context, and put culture at the core of transformational learning.

Interdisciplinary study provides students with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills, to make connections between fields of study, to consider more than one disciplinary approach or methodology, and to bring to bear the insights from two or more disciplines in examining and/or responding to complex problems.

Definition:

Intercultural perspectives is a set of cognitive, affective and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts. 

Interdisciplinary perspectives allow studens to distinguish between the distinct approaches of two or more disciplines; identify and apply authentic connections between two or more disciplines; and explore and synthesize the approaches or views of the two or more disciplines.

Evaluative Components:

  • Students understand the socially constructed nature of identities
  • Students recognize the significance of individual's differing relationships to power
  • Students understand how individuals , organizations, and institutions create, perpetuate, or challenge inequality
  • Student understand how multiple identities interact
  • Students demonstrate understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices
  • Students interpret intercultural experience from own and more than one worldview
  • Students distinguish between the distinct approaches of two or more disciplines
  • Students demonstrate awareness of the limitations and benefits of each contributing discipline
  • Students draws conclusions which represent a synthesis of examples, facts, approaches or theories from more than one field of study